Ventilation patient (boy) with smart vest is sitting at home. Patient is playing. Male nurse is explaining the smart vest to his mother, who is sitting on the couch.

Ventilation

Linde offers homecare ventilation therapy for individuals suffering from severe COPD and other respiratory illnesses, spinal cord injuries, and neuromuscular disorders.

How can ventilation therapy help?


Ventilation therapy - also known as mechanical ventilation - uses gentle air pressure to mechanically assist or replace spontaneous breathing.

There are two main types of ventilation therapy:

    - non-invasive, where air is delivered via a mask or nasal cannula.
    - Invasive ventilation, which requires a tracheotomy, where a cannula is inserted into the windpipe.

Modern technology has helped make it increasingly normal for stable ventilator-dependent patients to be treated at home.

Ventilation therapy can help the patient’s symptoms by:

    - improving the effective exchange of gases
    - making breathing easier, while also relieving the respiratory muscles

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV )

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) - also called non-invasive mechanical ventilation - uses gentle air pressure to mechanically assist or replace spontaneous breathing.
NPPV improves the effective exchange of gases and makes breathing easier, while also relieving the respiratory muscles.
Unlike invasive ventilation, which is delivered via an artificial airway, with NPPV air is delivered via a mask that covers the mouth and nose.

There are three types of respirator device for non-invasive positive pressure ventilation:

    - volumetric (delivering by volume)
    - barometric (delivering by pressure)
    - combined (which deliver both by volume and pressure)

The respiratory specialist will recommend the right type of respirator according to the patient’s condition and the required settings which are tailored to their particular needs.

Male nurse is explaining the full fask mask to the ventilation patient. Patient is sitting on a couch at home. Device is lying on the desk in front of patient.